Common Sources of Asbestos in Old Homes

Common Sources of Asbestos in Old Homes Owning a home is a great responsibility. From purchasing to reconstruction, you have total control over the home-owning process. One thing you don’t have control over, unfortunately, is where asbestos might be hiding in your home, especially if it was constructed before 1975. Here are four areas where you might find asbestos in an old home.

Look Up

Asbestos was a common feature of old ceiling tiles and roof shingles, so look up! Asbestos becomes a safety hazard when it’s made airborne, and ceiling fans may move asbestos dust around without your knowledge. If your ceilings are in rough shape, asbestos fibers can come loose and contaminate the air in your home.

Check Your Pipes

Asbestos dust can also become airborne when old asbestos insulation around boilers and pipes begins to break down. Transite pipes, which were used extensively in water distribution systems during the mid-1900s, also contain asbestos cement. If these pipes aren’t replaced before the cement starts to break down, they may release asbestos fibers into your drinking water.

Tread Lightly

Are you thinking about replacing old floor tiles? Try to find out when the tiles were installed first. Asbestos tiling was extremely popular from the 1920 to the 1960s, and you can even find them in homes built as recently as the 1980s. If you suspect you might have asbestos floor tiles in your home, consult a professional home inspector before replacing them.

Walls

Before you decide to tear that ghastly 70s-style kitchen wall out, find out what it’s made of. Many older homes were constructed with fire-resistant sheets, which, when drilled or demolished, can release asbestos into your home.

 

The only way to know for certain whether your old home contains asbestos material is to have it examined by a professional home inspector. Give yourself some peace of mind, and schedule an inspection with one of our certified and trustworthy professionals today.