Lead-Based Paint Remains a Concern in Chicago’s Older Homes

Peeling PaintDespite the Chicago Department of Public Health’s efforts to address lead hazards in older homes, many neighborhoods in and around the city are still in need of lead paint abatement. Although lead-based paint is relatively harmless when left undisturbed, it can because a serious health hazard when it begins to deteriorate into a toxic dust.

Young children tend to be particularly vulnerable to lead poisoning, as they are more likely to accidentally ingest small flakes of lead paint that fall from walls and ceilings. Because their brains are still developing, they are also more susceptible to the neurological damage caused by lead poisoning. According to a report from ABC 7 news, more than 4,500 children in Cook County tested positive for lead poisoning in 2014.

Should you be concerned about the presence of lead paint in your home?

If your home was built before 1978 and has never undergone an extensive renovation, there’s a good chance that there is at least some lead-based paint in your home. Even if the walls and ceilings have been repainted numerous times over the years, you may be able to spot signs of chipping lead paint around door frames, window sills, stairs and railings.  

In general, it’s always best to err on the side of caution when it comes to lead-based paint. This is especially true if you have children in your family. At First Choice Inspectors, our lead inspections are specifically designed to uncover lead paint hazards in the older homes in our area. In the event that we identify signs of deteriorating lead paint, we can also recommend a lead abatement company to help you safely resolve the issue once and for all.

To schedule an inspection, give us a call at (773) 429-9711 today.

Is Your Home At Risk For Lead Poisoning?

Lead PoisoningHow old is your home? If it was built before 1978, there’s a chance that its woodwork contains lead-based paint. Though the use of lead-based paints for homes has been banned in the United States since 1978, many people live in homes constructed before then, and those homes probably contain lead-based paint used in a bygone era before it was known to be detrimental to people’s health.

Lead poisoning occurs when lead builds up in a person’s body over a period of months or years. Little kids who eat lead-paint chips can end up with serious mental and physical problems. Adults who do home renovations and are exposed to lead-based paint and lead-contaminated dust are also at risk. In the old days, lead pipes, brass plumbing fixtures and copper pipes soldered with lead were commonly used in homes. Unfortunately, they could end up releasing lead particles into tap water.

Lead can get into the air, water and soil such that precautions need to be taken if and when a person lives or works around an area with high concentrations of lead.

How do you know if you have lead poisoning? With children, look for developmental delays, learning difficulties, irritability, loss of appetite, vomiting, constipation and other symptoms. As for adults, some lead poisoning symptoms include muscle and joint pain, memory loss, decline in mental functioning, mood disorders, abdominal pain, constipation, and high blood pressure. Pregnant women should be especially careful to avoid exposure to lead as it could harm their unborn child.

First Choice Inspectors of Chicago regularly conducts home inspections. During these inspections, your inspector can look for signs of peeling or chipped paint. Keep in mind that the lead material used in old paint only becomes a health hazard when it is disturbed. If the inspector finds that your home has old paint that’s disturbed, he or she may advise you to seek a professional renovation company to properly remove the old paint.