Inspection Items That Can Make or Break Your Resale Value

Inspection Items That Can Make or Break Your Resale ValueBefore you put your home on the market, it’s imperative that you have a clear understanding of the underlying issues that might be hiding beneath the surface. Your home might look fine at first glance, but the last thing you want is for a prospective buyer to discover structural issues that can seriously compromise the resale value of your home.  By having your home inspected before you put it on the market, you can give you and your buyers the peace of mind of knowing that your home isn’t in need of serious repairs. In this entry, we’ll look at a few issues that can seriously impact your home’s resale value.

Mold

There’s nothing that can scare away prospective buyers quite like a hidden patch of black mold. Mold is a tell-tale sign that your home has fallen victim to water intrusion, and it is often an indicator of more serious issues such as rot in the frame of your home. Many types of mold are hazardous to human health as well, which is an added concern for house hunters.

Polybutylene Piping

This gray piping which resembles PVC was used to plumb many homes between the 1970’s and 1990’s. Unfortunately, polybutylene piping degrades due to oxidants in water, causing it to leak and break over time.  Polybutylene piping has become a serious concern for home insurance companies in recent years. If you do have polybutylene piping in your home, it’s worth the expense of having it replumbed  before you even try to put it on the market.

Foundation Cracks

While foundation cracks come in many degrees of severity, the most serious ones can cause tens of thousands of dollars to repair. Worst of all, large foundation cracks can also indicate that your foundation is slanted or uneven. Rebuilding a foundation wall is an undertaking that few buyers will want to take on.

Want to find out for sure whether or not your house is ready to sell? Give us a call to schedule an inspection today.

Setting the stage for a home sale

Courtesy of The Philadelphia Inquirer

Spring, is traditionally, the best time to buy or sell real estate, even through the downturn.  Al Heavens from The Philadelphia Inquirer writes about how to set the stage for a home sale.  For sellers, it is time for real estate theater; the house is the star.  “The cast includes agents and brokers, home inspectors, title people, mortgage companies, lenders, underwriters and, obviously, buyers.”  Some sellers are very hands on, while others do not want to bother with the day to day.  Paul Leiser of Avalon Real Estate in New Jersey said he believes that the internet has empowered the sellers and buyers.  Realtors are dealing with more informed involvement on both buyers and sellers, so confrontation can be minimized if an agent keeps the seller informed.  Sellers seem open to agent’s suggestions, the home staging will be up to the owner rather than the agent.  The seller who thinks he or she knows all may end up disappointed and a house that sells for less.  The house should be available for showings but at no point should the seller enter into conversation with potential buyers, the agents, appraiser, or home inspector.  The job of the agent is to educate the buyer and seller on the present climate and conditions.


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